Deal struck on Jan. 6 commission, with House vote scheduled next week

Deal struck on Jan. 6 commission, with House vote scheduled next week

After months of foot-dragging and obstruction from Republicans to the forming an independent commission to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, a bipartisan deal has emerged. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had delegated Homeland Security Chairman Bennie Thompson to work with ranking committee member John Katko of New York to find a solution. One, it should be noted, that has been greeted tepidly by Republican House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

Thompson and Katko have crafted legislation to create a commission modeled after the 9/11 panel. It would have 10 members, half of them appointed by Democratic congressional leaders, who would also appoint the chair. Republicans would appoint the other half, including the vice chair. Critically, if the chair and vice chair agree, the panel would have the power to issue subpoenas. So, problematically, they can veto each other’s efforts to subpoena witnesses or documents. On the other hand, the chair is given sole power to get information from federal agencies and to appoint staff.

That, New York University law professor Ryan Goodman tells Greg Sargent at The Washington Post, gives the forces of truth a chance to prevail. “Thanks to powers invested in the Chairperson alone, the Democratically-appointed members would have significant control over the direction of the investigation,” Goodman said, helping to prevent Republican appointees from “engaging in mischief.” He added that the “Chairperson would be able to move ahead quickly with getting information from the government without needing a vote,” saying that the chair can “appoint staff” who would “shape how the investigation and hearings unfold.”

The bill specifies that those members cannot be “an officer or employee of an instrumentality of government”—i.e. there can be no currently serving government officials on the panel. They must have “national recognition and significant depth of experience in at least two” areas: previous government service; law enforcement; civil rights, civil liberties, and privacy; experience in the armed forces or intelligence or counterrorism; and a background in cybersecurity or technology or law. A final report, including recommendations for preventing future attacks, would be due at the end of this calendar year.

McCarthy told reporters Friday morning that he hadn’t looked at the text yet (he’s been too busy installing Trump’s toady in leadership to pay attention, I guess), but continues to have concerns about the scope. Namely that “you got to look at the buildup before, and what went on afterward,” meaning the BLM and antifa straw men.

The House is voting on the bill next week, along with a supplemental funding bill to beef up Capitol security. It will pass, and should get at least a handful of Republican votes, if not a few dozen, including one from Rep. Liz Cheney, who got a coveted Wall Street Journal quote Friday (take that, Stefanik). “I hope we’ll be able to really have the kind of investigation we need about what happened on Jan. 6,” Cheney said.

“As I have called for since the days just after the attack, an independent, 9/11-style review is critical for getting answers our [Capitol Police] officers and all Americans deserve,” Katko said in a statement announcing the agreement. “This is about facts, not partisan politics.” Thompson said in his statement. “I am pleased that after many months of intensive discussion, Ranking Member Katko and I were able to reach a bipartisan agreement. […] Inaction—or just moving on—is simply not an option. The creation of this commission is our way of taking responsibility for protecting the U.S. Capitol.”

As of this writing, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell hasn’t reacted to the announcement that a deal has been struck, or that the legislation should advance in the House as soon as next week. In the past, he’s been critical of the effort, casting it as “partisan” and demanding that the commission also encompass “the full scope of the political violence problem in this country,” meaning those BLM and antifa straw men again.

One of the problems with McCarthy and McConnell potential foot-dragging is, of course, whether it would pass in the Senate with the filibuster. The other problem is that the two of them are responsible, along with Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, for appointing half of the commission members. That gives them more opportunity to delay, with the clock ticking on the still-unformed commission’s deadline for the end of the year for a report and recommendations.

On the other hand, McConnell has no love for Trump. Here’s a pretty much hands-off way for him to damage Trump and to fight the Big Lie. He could make sure that at least some of the five Republican appointees aren’t Trumpers. There are plenty of former Republican officials who would relish the opportunity to serve as his proxy.

It’s also incumbent on someone in Republican leadership to acknowledge reality, especially as the lunatic fringe of the House Republicans have taken over and are in full denial mode. There was the truly ugly revisionism on display in this week’s House Oversight hearing, where Republican Rep. Paul Gosar called even investigating the events of Jan. 6 an assault by the “deep-state” on “law-abiding citizens,” and GOP Rep. Andrew Clyde said that day in the Capitol looked like a “normal tourist visit.” The nation’s dumbest man (yes, dumber than Sen. Ron Johnson) Rep. Louie Gohmert took to the floor Friday to flat-out lie about the events of that day.

Here’s McConnell’s chance to counter what’s happening in his party in the House, including the ouster of Cheney in deference to Trump and the Big Lie. After Trump’s acquittal on his second impeachment, McConnell excoriated Trump. He said that Trump was “practically and morally responsible” for the attack. “This was an intensifying crescendo of conspiracy theories orchestrated by an outgoing president who seemed determined to either overturn the voters’ decision or else torch our institutions on the way out,” McConnell said. “A mob was assaulting the Capitol in his name,” he said. “These criminals were carrying his banners, hanging his flags and screaming their loyalty to him.”

Having said all that, it’s now largely going to be up to McConnell to do something about it.

From Daily Kos at Read More. This article is republished from DailyKos under an open content license. Read the original article at DailyKos.

More News Stories

Loading...

More Political News

Loading...